A Hussain et al, 2018. Caffeine: a potential protective agent against cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease, Critical Review in Eukaryiotic Gene Expression, Volume 28 (1).

ABSTRACT

Over the past few decades, caffeine has been well recognized as a stimulant whose effects can be detected particularly in the central nervous system. A stimulating effect of caffeine has been found useful in treating patients with many neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is reported to be a rapidly increasing public health problem with lack of a remedial treatment. However, the assumed protective effects of caffeine against AD are of huge interest. This study substantiates caffeine’s role as a potential prevention agent against AD through several epidemiological studies. More than 75% of available study reports support the opinion that caffeine has a favorable effect against cognitive decline and AD. Moreover, other studies have discussed the effect of caffeine drinking and concluded several positive effects on cognitive functioning. The present study, however, focuses more on the potential mechanisms by which caffeine diminishes effects as well as delays the onset of AD.

 

The post A Hussain et al, 2018. Caffeine: a potential protective agent against cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease, Critical Review in Eukaryiotic Gene Expression, Volume 28 (1). appeared first on Coffee and Health.

S Y Park et al, 2018. Prospective study of coffee consumption and cancer incidence in non-white populations, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, published online.

ABSTRACT

 

Background:
Coffee intake has been associated with risk of various cancers, but the findings, mostly from studies in white populations, are inconsistent. We examined the association of coffee consumption with overall cancer incidence and specific cancer sites in a large prospective study of African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos and whites.

Methods:
167,720 participants of the Multiethnic Cohort Study in Hawaii and Los Angeles were included. Baseline coffee intake was assessed by a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for sixteen cancers associated with coffee intake were calculated using Cox regressions.

Results:
During a mean follow-up of 15.3 years, 34,031 incident cancer cases were identified among study participants. Coffee intake was associated inversely with liver (≥4 cups/day vs. none: HR=0.57; 95% CI, 0.38-0.87; Ptrend <0.001), ovarian (HR=0.33; 95% CI, 0.17-0.65; Ptrend = 0.007), and thyroid (HR=0.44; 95% CI, 0.23-0.87; Ptrend = 0.007) cancers and melanoma (HR=0.72; 95% CI, 0.52-0.99; Ptrend = 0.002). Coffee intake was also inversely associated with endometrial cancer among women with a body mass index >30 kg/m2 (HR=0.31; 95% CI, 0.14-0.72; Ptrend = 0.04). The associations were similar across five ethnic groups (Pheterogeneity >0.06) and were mainly observed among those who drank caffeinated coffee.

Conclusions:
Based on our prospective data in diverse populations, we found a decreased risk of liver, ovarian, thyroid and endometrial cancers and melanoma associated with higher coffee intake.

Impacts:
These results suggest that coffee drinking may protect against liver, ovarian, thyroid and endometrial cancers and melanoma.

The post S Y Park et al, 2018. Prospective study of coffee consumption and cancer incidence in non-white populations, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

8504076283

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE:
To assess the association between dietary intake patterns from 1 to 4 years and BMI and body shape at age of 6 years.

METHODS:
This longitudinal study was based on 3374 Brazilian children from the 2004 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study. We used previously described dietary patterns from 1 to 4 years as the main exposure. We defined body shape using scores for corpulence (a recently described body shape component measured by Photonic Scanner), and trunk and gynoid fat mass percentage from DXA. We run linear regression models to evaluate the associations between dietary patterns from 1 to 4 years and BMI and body shape at 6 years.

RESULTS:
Several apparent associations between dietary patterns and BMI or body shape were explained by sociodemographic factors. High adherence to snacks (positive loadings to coffee, bread and cookies) at 4 years predicted lower BMI, but higher gynoid fat mass percentage at 6 years, while higher adherence to staple at 2 years (positive loadings to rice and beans) predicted higher trunk fat mass and lower gynoid fat mass. Finally, higher scores on milks at 1 year (positive loading to breast milk) predicted higher gynoid fat mass at 6 years.

CONCLUSION:
There were inconsistent associations between dietary patterns in infancy and early childhood and BMI and body shape at 6 years. In adjusted analyses, higher adherence to breast milk at 1 year and to snacks at 4 years appeared to be beneficial for body shape, associated with lower BMI, but higher peripheral fat.

The post L P Santos et al, 2018. Effects of dietary intake patterns from 1 to 4 years on BMI z-score and body shape at age of 6 years: a prospective birth cohort study from Brazil. European Journal of Nutrition, published online. appeared first on Coffee and Health.

L Mo et al, 2018. Coffee consumption and risk of myocardial infarction: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies, Oncotarget, Volume 9(30).

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:
Previous epidemiological studies have provided inconsistent conclusions on the effect of coffee consumption in the development of myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of coffee consumption and its potential dose-response patterns on the risk of developing MI.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:
Three databases were searched for evidence of eligible studies. A random-effects model was used to pool the fully adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Dose-response analysis was performed to show the effect of each cup increased in daily coffee drinking on the risk of MI.

RESULTS:
Seventeen studies involving 233,617 participants were included in our study. The association between coffee consumption and risk of MI did not show statistical significance when pooling the outcome data for the coffee consumption categories of 1~2 vs. < 1 cup per day (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.94-1.19) and 2~3 vs. < 1 cup per day (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.94-1.23). Compared with < 1 cup, daily drinking of 3~4 cups and > 4 cups of coffee were significantly associated with the risk of MI, and the pooled ORs (95% CIs) were 1.40 (1.11-1.77) and 1.48 (1.22-1.79), respectively. The dose-response analysis showed a “J-shaped” curve relationship of the risk of MI with coffee consumption.

CONCLUSIONS:
Daily drinking of more than three cups of coffee was associated with a significantly increased risk of MI. This positive association was only found in men but not in women. The impact of gender on this association should be further evaluated.

The post L Mo et al, 2018. Coffee consumption and risk of myocardial infarction: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies, Oncotarget, Volume 9(30). appeared first on Coffee and Health.